Posts Tagged ‘oil’

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NOT JUST THE 2003 IRAQ WAR…

March 7, 2014

But the Gulf War a decade before!

Rachel Maddow is not my favorite of the MSNBC personalities- but GOOD JOB last nite on IRAQ – why the Gulf War and why little Bush had to follow in the same footsteps as his father, and WHY I FEEL EXONERATED.

For 14 years I’ve been saying IRAQ had NOTHING to do with 9-11 – the second invasion of that country was totally a Cheney/Bush/Condi and others plan LONG before Sept 11.  My position has always been that and caused a good many “heated discussions” among some good friends.

So now my position has been backed up with lots and lots of written documentation, footage, and interviews finally available at least to the Press….and although I am exonerated personally, it makes me sicker than it did as it was happening…because at least then, there always was that little chance that I was wrong. 

Now we all know, the dirty ugly way we started the 21st century with yet another Bush administration was in fact reality.  All those who died, or were wounded, or whose lives were deeply impacted by time spent fighting that unnecessary war did so for oil….led by men whose money came from the Oil Industry.  Makes me sick. 

And of course, one will never know, but perhaps if they had been a bit more FOCUSED on protecting the US , maybe they just would have picked up a signal or two that the emerging phenom of terrorists  that had certainly shown its ugly head in the Clinton Administration was not Democratic bumbling, but something they needed to “key an eye and ear” on.

Of course, I still have that second theory of motivation for it.  BIG Bush went into the Gulf War, accomplished his limited mission (no matter what you think of that mission) and got out…even though Cheney and others were advising otherwise. Then Cheney saw his chance by manipulating LITTLE Bush  in the dawn of the new millennium.  Remember MAMA Bush famous quote re Georgie Jr:  “He’s not my brightest son”.  No kidding.  I’ve always suspected that Cheney manipulated Little Bush by appealing to that “I’ll show him; I can do it better” little boy mentality about his father.

And although I am probably wrong, I can’t stop my mind from wandering to the same question I was asking post 9-11.  Why did we go to war in Afghanistan?  Yes, they were “harboring” the man who planned 9-11.  But was the Bush Administration so full of hubris they really thought they could WIN a war that Russia had fought endlessly there with no good results?  Did they forget we ARMED the very people we were now going to fight against?

Was there ANY attempt to do what Obama finally planned and did- kill Osama bin-Laden?

And do the Bushies and the evil Dick Cheney have ANY regrets for their missteps?  Or, was it just the macho cowboy BS we had to put up for the whole 8 years LITTLE Bush was in office?  He should have started painting earlier, if you ask me.   That has thankfully, kept him out of sight and out of mind. (although I continue to have this nagging thought…does he really see himself as another Eisenhower-a great General who became President and then retired to become an artist?)  YIKES!

And for all the repos who have been against Obama not just because he is a Democrat, nor for the color of his skin, but because he voted NO to going into Iraq?  Yes, those same ones that started the spin already on today’s crisis…Obama is weak; we need to get tough and go in, confront the Russians, and push back. 

Just take one minute and ask yourself.  Is this 1950? 1960? 1970? 1980? 1990? 2000?   We don’t have such a good track record in our wars through those sixty years, do we?    We have ended neither the FIRST one in Korea, nor the LAST one in AFGHANISTAN…so now, I guess, we have to revert to our winning tactics…world wars with more deaths or a long cold war while all the little kids have bomb drills and hide under their desks to survive a nuclear attack.

One more time….Being against war is NOT Unpatriotic despite the Bush propaganda machine; and what is wrong with trying Cooperation and Collaboration and Compromise? It’s not as macho, but just maybe…we could save lives, money and achieve something peacefully.

 

 

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PONDERINGS

January 9, 2014

SNOWDON AND THE NSA

A short STRIB feature this morning raised a thought-provoking question as debate continues on the NSA and the FISA courts.

Apparently, the general consensus is that the Supreme Court represents some of the least tech-savy people in the country.  www.startribune/politics/national/239124211.html  Reading the article, it becomes clear why there is controversy over Snowdon as a whistleblower vs. a traitor, as well as a growing discussion on why similar activities conducted by commercial and corporate entities (especially world-wide-web participants) are acceptable but less-intrusive government data gathering is not.

Even members of the Supreme Court are suggesting a reliance on the Fourth Amendment to resolve this issue in cases currently bubbling up in the system may not be the answer to resolving these issues of the 21st century.

In a way, that is comforting as it does point out the wisdom of the founding fathers as they drafted the constitution to become guiding principles, but at the same time allowed for amendments as necessary to change it to cover unforeseen future circumstances.

On the other hand, can you imagine the angst, emotion, and drama that would accompany any movement to amend the Constitution to clarify this issue in our world today?  I am afraid it would rank up there with slavery, women’s rights and the civil rights movement in terms of tearing the country apart.

ISRAEL AND REFUGEES

Keep an eye on this one…at least on the surface, the “Do unto others as you would have them do unto you” mantra does not seem to be applicable – at least in all cases.

It is surely a complicated question that does indeed confront the Jewish state with key questions about its identity, who is a refugee, and do Jews have a special duty to be accommodating in light of their own history.

It does not appear to be a black/white issue; there have been attempts at accommodation; there have been concerns; and definitely there has been unequal treatment of Christian and Muslim refugees.

Sadly, as I read it, I could not help but draw some parallels to our country and our conflicted stance of  freedom and immigration – especially in view of the fact the US was also founded by early settlers often looking for refuge from persecution….and in so doing, created tremendous conflicts with the indigenous peoples already living in the land we wanted.  And yet, we are not always welcoming to those modern immigrants seeking refuge in what we built as a white man’s world.

 

AN ECONOMIC WORD GAME

A New York Times report on Obama’s comments yesterday following the Senate decision to debate the Jobless Benefits bill pointed out a truism that actually made me smile.

Yes, there is a careful “balance” going on in the 2014 message of “despite an improving economy, too many people are being left behind.”

The NY Times ended the article by citing critics calling it a “muddled economic message the White House has been delivering for years under Obama”.

And yes, the economic is not a right/wrong or black/white situation…it is a mixture.  There is not just a single“right” answer;  the situation is complex.

We are too used to right vs. wrong with no nuances depending on our own political leanings along with the color of our skin.  We forget there is truth and fiction in both.

So perhaps that is why I see Obama and the way he thinks as a mixture of white and African-as a good thing. He, like our world, is complicated.  He, like our world, challenges both sides.  That, in my mind, makes him a good leader.

Maybe we are so critical of him only because it is scary – because whether we agree or disagree, we cannot go backwards.   There is no winner in black vs white or left wing vs right wing.

The way forward for success in the future is collaboration – from which will come a better way than either stance today.

OIL, PIPELINES, TRAINS and the MIDDLE EAST

We’ve tipped the scale; most of our oil comes from within our own country today; North Dakota is booming; jobs are plentiful…all good things.

Enter the pipeline vs environment debates and the reality of unsafe trains causing concern over hazardous materials…one more time, proof there is often on easy answer to almost anything in today’s world!

Then another question popped into my head to confuse the situation more.  With our capacity increasing, it is creating more self-sufficiency in terms of fuel.  What is that impact on the US relationship with the Middle East?  As far as I know, we have not heard much discussion on that.

  But obviously, if we produce most of our own oil, we are not reliant on the Middle East and that could well mean less dollars are flowing there from us – despite  financial help to various countries in need.  We most likely no longer carry the mantra of Good Customer in the Middle East – we have become something else.  Are we SURE that it is the tensions of “Obama’s” US policy goals alone that has changed the tone and attitudes?    Food for thought as you listen to the next rant from your favorite commentator claiming Obama’s approach is not working well.

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TEDDY ROSSEVELT’S GOLDEN POND

June 12, 2012

Is there a way to find a win-win in this very complex scenario? 

As I read the STRIB article Sunday, my immediate reaction was YES! Make it a national monument to Teddy Roosevelt to commemorate his role in establishing our National Park system….and get it moving so it can become a part of the NPS 100th Anniversary in 2016.

But as I read on, it became an increasingly complex situation…with oil wells pumping crude there for decades; the government purchase that did not include the rights to oil and minerals below the surface ; a second government turndown to purchase at a later date; the plan for gravel pit to supply needed  gravel for new roads to support the oil boom (and employment); and an in-process evaluation of that permit request to determine project effect on air quality, water quality, and wildlife-not to speak of noise and dust.  And then an additional wrinkle of its impact on a proposed $15 million bridge over the Little Missouri to connect two highways and cut off 100 miles of travel off some commutes – also in the midst of a developing environmental impact statement regarding various crossing locations near the ranch.

 All this, but there is no mention of impact/ thoughts from the residents – indigenous people,  the whites and other immigrants that settled, and call the area their home.

By the end of the article, it seemed pretty obvious, there was no RIGHT answer.  There are issues/advantages and rights on all sides of the dilemma…and most likely, a lot of emotion on all points. 

A lesson, I guess, for those like me that have strong opinions on many topics…this situation is a great illustration that there often is no single RIGHT solution for issues we face in our complex world….and yet,  it is  one  more example that arguing right vs wrong will not work and why we as a people need to hone our collaboration skills to learn from each other and craft new ways going forward.