Posts Tagged ‘Keith Goldberg’

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KEITH GOLDBERG’s LESSONS LEARNED

November 20, 2010

And now some excerpts taken from Goldberg’s report in EVENT DESIGN October 2010.  The pavilion descriptions definitely reflect effective rules we might all do well to embrace!

OLDER FOLKS DIG (THE RIGHT) TECHNOLOGY.  Interactive touchscreens delivered content in such graphic, intuitive ways that a child or senior citizen could get into it.

THE MOST POWERFUL TOOL IN MARKETING IS THE NARRATIVE JOURNEY – those that embraced the expo theme of “Better City, Better Life” by creating journeys that reflected the progress of their own cities were rewarded  with buzz throughout the visitor audience.

INTIMATE STORYTELLING IS KEY TO CREATING COMMUNITY – and Chile did it best!

SIZE DOESN”T ALWAYS MATTER. It was inspiring to see an unexpected and smaller exhibitor step up and leverage technology to tell its story.

KIDS EVERYWHERE ARE SELF-CENTERED (IN A WONDERFULLY CHARMING WAY, OF COURSE)

THE HOLOGRAM MAY (UNFORTUNATELY) NEVER DIE …despite being an unreliable technique that often does not work.

OVER-PROMISE & UNDER-DELIVER IS NOT A WINNING STRATEGY. Don’t let this happen to you.

NO MAN IS AN ISLAND…BUT A PAVILION CAN BE.  Saudi Arabia created a desert island with rooftop oasis with a 3D/360 degree theatre the size of two football fields and people waiting in line for up to 8 hours for the privilege of seeing it..proof that if you build something people want, they will come.

CAPTURE HEARTS AND MINDS…AND BUTTS..”dwell time” is partly dependent on level of comfort…whatever you can do to integrate comfort into the experience always pays dividends.

KEEP THE IDEA BIG AND THE EXECUTION SIMPLE …as did Belguim with their “iceberg in two blocks, separated by a crevasse” to demonstrate climate change.

EVERYONE LOVES A PANDA and World Wildlife Fund with their panda logo did it well

DELIVER ON YOUR PROMISES. Poland promised an experience to meld its folk heritage with its position as a modern nation and through integrating its established exterior look into a design that enabled technology, media and theatre to bring their story to life – did just that.

COOL MATERIALS DRAW A CROWD. Just look at Spain’s pavilion with its wicker panels adhered to steel and glass to suggest the flowing lines of a Flamenco dancer’s skirt.

YOU ARE DEFINED BY THE COMPANY YOU KEEP- Just as our parents taught.  In the event and exhibit world, it is important how you are positioned in the minds of customers as well as “on the floor”.  In Shanghai, Iran and North Korea were virtually connected – with not much to show.  Lines were short and that may be the real insight gleaned.

BE AUTHENTIC as Canada so skillfully demonstrated.

RETRO NEVER GETS OLD – as China proved with the flying saucer-shaped Expo Culture Center.

EVERY MASCOT IS A DESCENDANT OF GUMBY – and the official mascot of World Expo, “Haibo” caused Ken to wonder “What happened to Pokey?”

IF YOU HAVE HOME FIELD ADVANTAGE, USE IT.    And China did. After  dictating size and height parameters to the rest of the world, they broke their own rules –and built bigger, and beautiful for their own pavilion.

And the parting comment from Keith was that perhaps the most powerful part of the experience in Shanghai was touring with thousands of people from very different cultures…all waiting in line together…all surprised and delighted by similar things…moved by the same stories…and were happy to share these moments with each other…Face-to-Face.  Live.

So much food for thought from his insights. Thank you Keith Goldberg and EVENT DESIGN for sharing.

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LESSONS LEARNED

November 20, 2010

I have spent most of my free moments of late immersed in photos, videos and commentary from the Shanghai Expo.  I thought I was getting my arms wrapped around the hows, whys, and why nots, as my list of ideas inspired by the commentary from US visitors continued to grow.

But experience designer Keith Goldberg’s article in Event Design Magazine jolted me into a new perspective when I read his introduction to lessons he learned in Shanghai:

“I can’t help but draw a parallel to the legendary “White City” built for the Chicago World’s Fair in 1893. Just as its expanse and majesty heralded the coming American century, the grandeur of the World Expo in Shanghai (and the efforts made by exhibitors to impress their Chinese hosts) heralds China’s modern-day rise…there is no more amazing window into how our world has progressed and changed over the years…you also realize what hasn’t changed is the motivation of host countries and exhibitors to put forth their best efforts, tell their stories in engaging ways, and create the kind of community that leads to relationships (a/k/a commerce).”

Like Goldberg, I am a history buff, so the US/China World Fair comparisons hit home immediately and pointed out that I was so engrossed in the detail that I missed a very important overview – that feeds into Lenderman’s “Brand New World” and his theories regarding the developing hypermarkets of the BRIC and their influence on our world of the future.  (see blog October 20, 2010).  Once again, I was jolted out of the safe world of US superiority in innovation/creativity/power over the last century into a whole new world – where unless we adapt, we will be left behind.

And more important, I was so focused on the details of the “how” that I failed to pick up on the more impactful “why”.   Oh yes, I was looking at the broader “trends” communicated over and over that pertain to my professional world – that of experiential event design – but I was shutting out the global impact of the phenomenon itself – and shutting out that nagging comment I heard in my first exposure to Shanghai a month or so ago…that comment about the American Pavilion being “underwhelming”. 

Lots of big thoughts here – but the reality is none of us can afford to continue to do over and over again what led to success for us in the past.  We need to keep engaged in the world and what is happening around us – and let our human curiosity for how does that work, what’s next, how can I do it better, guide us towards improving what we have done before.  A lesson we seem to have to learn over and over again – while we “rest on our laurels” and pontificate about how our experiences allows us to know what’s best, the rest of the world will pass us by.