Posts Tagged ‘expensive infastructure’

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SPATIAL FIXES for Ecomonic Recovery

June 24, 2012

According to Richard Florida, one of the key things that has to happen to recover from a generational GREAT RESET comes not from top-down policies and programs  (see Blog of June 18) but does come gradually as millions and millions of people respond  to challenging economic  times  by changing the very way they live.   

This is called a spatial fix.  It happened in the Long Depression when movement was from farms to cities; it happened in the Great Depression when people moved from dense cities to inner ring suburbs.

And then as the economic bloat began, we moved to poorly-built McMansions in outer ring cities, and then we created the exurbs and demanded infastructure to follow.  Florida postulates that when the people determine this is not sustainable and begin on their own to migrate once again to smaller spaces, to consolidate along transit lines and turn their backs on exurbs and unsustainable and expensive super highways, we will have begun the real start of the economic recovery to move us out of the Great Recession of the 21st century.

So the STRIB’s headlines” Housing’s comeback spurs new building”/”House construction sees modest, focused comeback”caught my attention and infused a little hope into my day.

It seems builders are putting new emphasis on areas close to jobs and existing highways.  And even more important:

,,,the developments have a different flavor than those that boomed before the Great Recession:  Smaller and concentrated in places where jobs, transit and major highways are already nearby…in contrast to the rural cornfields that became subdivisions in the mid-2000s.

And the flip side, says the Strib, is stagnation in the exurbs.

YES!  That’s a good sign…and maybe there is even hope that the Minnesota snowbirds – who mostly are upside-down in their winter palaces- will not have ready cash to negatively influence this natural adjustment of the people.  Although what some will do without elevators in their garages, I just don’t know.

So, I am not holding my breath, but I will be keeping an eye out for additional signs that support the spatial fix.  I can only hope that it will “trickle-down” and things like buying a soup bone for $1.59 a pound that yielded less than 2 ounces of meat (read: equivalent of $23 per pound) will also slowly be adjusted.  Until then, I guess I will buy a small sirloin when I make  my soup – it is cheaper!

 

 

 

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