h1

COLLABORATIVE PRINCIPLES

April 15, 2013

I often refer to the world of the 21st century as the world of collaboration-rather than the world of hierarchies we knew and understood in the 20th century.  Within my own world of events, we have been experimenting with the collaborative process for almost a decade now, and many of us are convinced that although it is “messy”, it yields better results for our clients because we pool all perspectives to come up with a single vision and action plan to move forward to accomplish the client’s defined goals.  Working together, listening, challenging, and gaining consensus on an action plan has served us well-whether we are addressing desired outcomes, design, production, communication, learning applications or a social media plan within each event.

Meanwhile, slowly but surely, “collaboration” is being kidnapped by the technology world, as its definition has been applied to the emerging world of technology and social media.  When one sees “collaboration”, one can expect to hear/read about how best to integrate social media into an organization.  So I often find myself scanning an article quickly, but a recent article in Tech Republic entitled “The 12 Habits of Highly Collaborate Organizations” caught my eye.

The author, Jacob Morgan of Chess Media Group and author of The Collaborative Organization outlined several principles that I think are applicable in any situation-not just when building a social media platform to facilitate better communication and collaboration within a specific group.  I offer them here as food for thought.  Note that I have used the term “employee” as Morgan did, but I think this is applicable for customers, vendors and partners as well.

  • ·         Individual benefit is just as important as the overall corporate benefit (if not more important):  Don’t focus on why this is important to your organization; focus on what the employee is looking for-how will this make their jobs and lives easier.
  • ·         Strategy before Technology:  Although this is self-explanatory I think, I also know how often we jump from a problem to a popular solution-technology or other-without taking the time to clearly think it through, develop a strategy, and THEN select a best solution that can be monitored and refined through-out the process.
  • ·         Listen to the voice of the employee:  Make employees a part of the decision making process from the beginning.  Listen to their ideas, their needs, and their suggestions and integrate their feedback into your strategy.
  • ·         Learn to get out of the way:  Learn to empower and support your employees and then get of of their way.  “Managers need to follow from the front.”
  • ·         Lead by example:  Leaders can facilitate change and encourage desired results if they are visibly part of the process.
  • ·         Integrate into the flow of work:  Collaboration becomes the process; not an additional step to accomplish work.
  • ·         Create a supportive environment:  Recognize and reward collaboration, not just individual efforts.
  • ·         Measure what matters:  Try to measure engagement-how connected and passionate an employee feels about the company and the work they do.
  • ·         Persistence:  Making collaboration work isn’t AN option, it is THE option.
  • ·         Adapt and evolve:  Collaboration is a perpetual process, not a one-time exercise.  We need to adapt and evolve as things change; keep a pulse on the industry; and innovate and anticipate.
  • ·         Employee collaboration also benefits the customer:  Employees are able to provide a better experience and superior support by being able to tap into internal experts, information, and resources which can be used to help customers.
  • ·         Collaboration can make the world a better place:  Yes, it provides better solutions for our clients, but it also allows those who collaborate to feel more connected, reduces stress at the workplace, makes the job easier, allows for more work freedom, and in general makes us happier people.

This all makes good sense no matter where you are collaborating or with whom.  I’ve condensed and paraphrased the twelve habits, but if you wish to read the full article and check out a great and simple graphic illustration, see http://www.techrepublic.com/blog/tech-manager/the-12-habits-of-highly-collaborative-organizations.

 

 

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: