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MORE BUSINESS, LESS TROUBLE

September 10, 2012

Most of my friends and family have converted.  They no longer subscribe to a printed newspaper,  but rely on news input totally from TV and digital sources.  I understand that; it is just one more thing to pay for and fit into a daily busy schedule.  I too, rely heavily on the digital feed – particularly of MNPOST – which I cannot praise enough – for its quickness in letting me know what is going on; for its candor; for its format that allows immediate comment and feedback – as oppose to the STRIB that only allows x number of access per month to their on-line version.

Nevertheless, I love the paper;   it is a resource I count on, as well as a lifelong habit that I cannot imagine living without.  I joke that I HAVE to read the paper before I leave my house in the morning…after all, the world may have ended and I would not know it if I did not read the paper.

(And yes, that reveals another habit.  “Peace and Quiet” in the morning.  No TV, No radio, No phone visiting.  My TV is on only in the evenings – and often only from 5:30 to 6:30 when I get the local and national UPDATE of the news. I need the quiet time to THINK and form my own opinions on issues-not parrot thoses of some news commentator.)

Often  I hear complaints – about the Wall Street Journal insert  or the lack of “breaking news” on Monday.  To me, that is logical.  Most of our business are open Monday-Friday….so Saturday and Sunday, they are not making a big splash to give reporters fodder to feed on – so add the little extra “The Wall Street Journal” – if nothing else, it humors those anxious to be identified as “in the know” as they can walk around bragging that they “read it in the Wall Street Journal”.  As for Monday, yup – there is not much breaking news in the “business insider”, but it has become one of my most valuable resources for new companies, new services and potential vendors that I or my client may need – I like the emphasis on small business and success stories.

Take this morning, for instance. 

I learned that, two war-weary Israelis, both political independents and moderates seeking better relations through cultural, educational and commercial initiatives turned their attention to peaceful initiatives to transcend the political and religious hostilities in the Middle East through a fellowship program at Hamline University called the Middle East Fellowship Exchange.

Each year about 20 Jordanians, Israelis, Palestinians, Lebanese-Jews, Christians, Muslims, liberal and conservative-  recruited by the  Zmoras- now both Israeli and US citizens- come to study Minnesota business and non-profits for five weeks.   Many have never fraternized with people from neighboring countries or other faiths, but with program focus on business, it enables the participants to be “Just people-not representatives of their respective communities.”

And as a result, they become friends; they share a respect and love for one another that inspires them to find ways to remain friends and resources for one another when they return home.  They have a better perspective on what the United States is- imperfect, but using commercial and cultural ties to bridge differences.  They do not fear each other, but become multipliers with new and valuable ideas for their community.  The Strib reports these like-minded moderates and entrepreneurs believe they can collaboratively build a stronger economy in the Jordan-Israel-West Bank-Lebanon neighborhood.

I concur, “Without efforts such as theirs, the Middle East will remain hobbled by the religious and political walls that bar a more prosperous future.

That’s the hope I experienced myself and among the people I grew to know in my travels in/out of Israel in the 1980s; it is so encouraging to hear that it still is there and being fed by a program right here in Minnesota.

“I am a big believer in collaboration with our neighboring countries, “ said Nir Hindi, a Hamline Fellow and marketing executive with NegevCo…an incubator for Israel’s alternative-energy and low-water agricultureal industries.  “We can contribute to each other knowledge and experience.  We start with small steps.”

What an encouraging perspective…..perhaps the STRIB should share it with Mr. Romney.

 

 

 

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